The Historian

Portrait of Louises von Orléans (detail) by Franz Xaver Winterhaler 
oil on canvas, 1841

Portrait of Louises von Orléans (detail) by Franz Xaver Winterhaler 

oil on canvas, 1841

obliteratedheart:

Paper sculptures by artist Daniel Agdag from his series ‘Sets for a Film I’ll never make’

obliteratedheart:

Paper sculptures by artist Daniel Agdag from his series ‘Sets for a Film I’ll never make’

ottoman-empire:

AN OTTOMAN SET OF DAMASCENED CALLIGRAPHER’S TOOLS, 19TH CENTURYOsmanlı Hattat Aletleri, 19.Yüzyıl

ottoman-empire:

AN OTTOMAN SET OF DAMASCENED CALLIGRAPHER’S TOOLS, 19TH CENTURY
Osmanlı Hattat Aletleri, 19.Yüzyıl

allmesopotamia:

“A cuneiform tablet from Nippur in Iraq dated to 2000 BC indicates the names of strings on the lyre and represents the earliest known example of music notation. Although these tablets were fragmentary, these tablets represent the earliest melodies found anywhere in the world.”

allmesopotamia:

“A cuneiform tablet from Nippur in Iraq dated to 2000 BC indicates the names of strings on the lyre and represents the earliest known example of music notation. Although these tablets were fragmentary, these tablets represent the earliest melodies found anywhere in the world.”

cosascool:

The Ghosts of World War II by Sergey Larenkov

Taking old World War II photos, Russian photographer Sergey Larenkov carefully photoshops them over more recent shots to make the past come alive. Not only do we get to experience places like Berlin, Prague, and Vienna in ways we could have never imagined, more importantly, we are able to appreciate our shared history in a whole new and unbelievably meaningful way.

theoddmentemporium:

The lace and linen undergarments date back to hundreds of years before women’s underwear was thought to exist. They had lain hidden in a vault beneath the floorboards of an Austrian castle since  the 15th century. Despite their state of decay, the knickers bear more than a passing resemblance to the string bikini briefs popular today, while the bra has the fitted cups and delicate straps of its modern-day counterparts. While it was known that medieval men wore undergarments like modern-day shorts, it was thought that their womenfolk simply wore a smock or chemise, and that knickers didn’t make an appearance until  the late 18th century. Bras were thought to be an even more modern invention, not appearing until around 100 years ago. However, Hilary Davidson, fashion curator at the Museum of London, said the discovery ‘totally rewrites’ fashion history, adding: ‘Nothing like this has  ever come up before.’